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FDA To Change Food Labels For First Time In 20 Yrs.

After more than two decades, the Federal Drug Administration is moving to change nutrition labels to help fight obesity and fit modern eating habits.
Posted at 9:33 AM, Feb 27, 2014

After more than two decades, the Federal Drug Administration is moving to change nutrition labels to help fight obesity and fit modern eating habits.  

Here's the FDA's example of the new label versus what labels look like now. As you can see, the calories and servings per container are both bolded, "Calories from fat" has been replaced has been replaced by "added sugars"

Also on the list, making serving sizes actually fit what people are eating or drinking in one sitting. As CNN points out, "if you buy a 20-ounce soda, you're probably not going to stop drinking at the 8-ounce mark."

According to Politico Michelle Obama and her staff were "... key in getting the proposal out of the FDA" where a change to food labels has reportedly been in the works for almost a decade. (Via Let's Move)

The FLOTUS and face of the 'Let's Move' campaign said in a press release, "Our guiding principle here is very simple: that you as a parent and a consumer should be able to walk into your local grocery store, pick up an item off the shelf and be able to tell whether it’s good for your family, ... this is a big deal." (Via The White House)

This change to food labels comes right on the heels of another big health announcement. 

"News that obesity in that group has plummeted 43%. ... In 2004, 14% of 2 to 5-year-olds were obese by 2012 that number had dropped to just 8%." (Via ABC)

But the question is, are companies ready to foot the bill for the FDA's proposed changes? 

The FDA estimates this change will cost the industry about $2 billion. And though no food companies have released any reactions to the news yet, an NYU nutrition professor told the New York Times, "My prediction is that this will be wildly controversial."

The proposal will have a 90-day comment period during whcih organizations, industry groups and the general public will be able to voice their opinions on the new label changes. When the rule is finalized, companies will have two years to implement the changes.