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Why Inclusive Toys Are About More Than Play Time

Toys that reflect real-life differences in skin color, hair, body type and more can help children feel more accepted, experts say.
Posted at 6:24 PM, Dec 16, 2016
and last updated 2016-12-17 04:02:58-05

From Barbies with curves to dolls with disabilities, kids have more options for play.

This representation matters.

SEE MORE: Comic Books, Like Everything Else, Benefit From Diversity

Toys are becoming more inclusive.

Experts say toys that challenge stereotypes about beauty and what's "normal" have a positive impact. 

SEE MORE: Looks Like Marvel Doesn't Hate Black Widow Toys After All

"When children are playing with toys and they are seeing their skin color and their family formation … that again just says, 'I am normal. I am part of this world. I am valued. I'm accepted,'" said Tarah Fleming, the education director of Our Family Coalition.