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Look: Majestic images of a supermoon light up the night sky

A supermoon occurs when our moon appears larger and brighter than normal, as a full moon orbits Earth at its closest point.
Stork stands in its nest as the supermoon rises in the night sky in Milan, Italy, Monday, July 3, 2023.
Posted at 9:05 PM, Jul 03, 2023
and last updated 2023-07-03 21:05:25-04

Images of a mysterious and vibrant supermoon were taken as it floated over multiple countries on Monday, before nightfall in the United States. 

The bright celestial object — our own moon — lit up not only the night sky, but some notable landmarks and cities.

In the night sky above Istanbul, Turkey, the large and bright moon illuminated parts of the city's Camlica Mosque.

(AP Photo/Francisco Seco)

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The moon rose high above the homes and structures of Istanbul. Another view of the city's Camlica Mosque, which opened to worshipers in 2019, is seen here as the moon highlights the portions that are not already lit up.

(AP Photo/Francisco Seco)

The city of Milan, Italy (top) could see some of the various shades of color in the moon as it shone bright and large above.

(AP Photo/Mukhtar Khan)

In the photo above, a partly cloudy night over the Indian-controlled Kashmir region on the Asian continent shows the mysterious supermoon as it lights up the sky there. 

The large, bright full moon silhouetted the Burj Khalifa, in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. 

The tower, which opened in January 2010, holds the record for world's tallest building, according to multiple stated criteria.

(AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)

A supermoon is seen when our moon is in a full cycle, while also orbiting our planet Earth at its closest point. 

They are not considered unusual, as they do occur as a regular part of our moon's orbit. But, they provide a special aesthetic on nights when visible. 

The moon orbits Earth with a slight "eccentricity," as Professor Sara Russell of the UK's Natural History Museum explains

The moon orbits around Earth from between about 223,693 miles to 248,548 miles away.