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Eating Slowly Could Help Stave Off Hunger After Meals: Study

According to a study from TCU, eating slowly can help you feel more full and significantly decrease the amount you consume in a single sitting.
Posted at 12:53 PM, Jan 03, 2014

Looking for ways to trim down in the New Year? We might have just the answer for you, and it could be as easy as just slowing down.

According to a study by researchers from Texas Christian University, eating slowly can help you feel more full and significantly decrease the amount you consume in a single sitting. (Via Food World News)

Researchers brought in two groups: one of normal weight participants and the other of overweight or obese participants. They then asked the participants to eat two meals.

 

“During one meal, participants had no timetable and were asked to eat slowly, chew thoroughly and take small bites. During the second meal, participants had a limited timetable and were asked to take large bites, chew quickly and keep their spoon in their hand the entire time.” (Via Fox News)

 

Both groups reported feeling full for longer after the slower meal.

 

The normal-weight group consumed 88 fewer calories when eating slowly — a 10 percent difference —  while the overweight/obese group consumed 58 fewer calories, just an 8 percent difference. (Via US News & World Report)

 

The study said the difference for overweight participants was “not statistically significant.” So eating slowly will help you consume fewer calories if you’re of a normal weight, but not if you’re overweight, right?

 

Well, a senior scientist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture criticized that finding, saying the study suffered from several analytic flaws. (Via HealthDay)

 

“There is no significant difference between 8 percent and 10 percent, meaning ... there is no difference in the effect of eating speed on [calorie] intake according to whether you are obese or lean.”

 

She also noted the overweight participants quote “substantially under-ate” during the study, which would call the results into question. The study was published online in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.